Grand Canyon drive-by shooting

Gary Hart Photography: River Rock, Colorado River, Grand Canyon

River Rock, Colorado River, Grand Canyon
Sony a7R II
Sony/Zeiss 24-70 f4
1/80 second
F/9
ISO 200

A couple of weeks ago I blogged about shooting sans tripod on my recent Grand Canyon raft trip. My rationale for this sacrilege was that any shot without a tripod is better than no shot at all. I have no regrets, partly because I ended up with Grand Canyon perspectives I’d have never captured otherwise, but also because shooting hand-held reinforced for me all the reasons I’m so committed to tripod shooting.

Much of my tripod-centric approach is simply a product of the way I’m wired—I’m pretty deliberate in my approach to most things, relying on anticipation and careful consideration rather than cat-like reflexes as my path to action. That would probably explain why my sport of choice is baseball, I actually enjoy golf on TV, and would take chess or Scrabble over any video game (I’m pretty sure the last video game I played was Pong). It also explains, despite being an avid sports fan, my preference for photographing stationary landscapes.

Despite this preference, for the last three years my camera and I have embarked on a one week raft trip through Grand Canyon, where the scenery is almost always in motion (relatively speaking, of course). And after three years, I’ve grown to appreciate how much floating Grand Canyon is like reading a great novel, with every bend a new page that offers potential for sublime reflection or heart pounding action. And just as I prefer savoring a novel, lingering on or returning to passages that resonate with me, I’d love to navigate Grand Canyon at my own pace. But alas….

The rock in this image was a random obstacle separated from the surrounding cliffs at some time in the distant past, falling victim to millennia of dogged assault by rain, wind, heat, cold, and ultimately, gravity. Understanding that the river is about 50 feet deep here makes it easier to appreciate the size of this rock, and the magnitude of the explosion its demise must have set off.

Unfortunately, viewing my subject at eight miles per hour precludes the realtime analysis and consideration its story merits, and I was forced to act now and think later. In this case I barely had time to rise, wobble toward the front of the raft, balance, brace, meter, compose, focus, and click. One click. Then the rock was behind me and it was time to turn the page.

Grand Canyon Photo Workshops

Rivers Front and Center

Click an image for a closer look, and a slide show. Refresh the screen to reorder the display.

 

4 Comments on “Grand Canyon drive-by shooting

  1. I’ve said it before, I’ll recapitulate my joy when viewing your majestic work. Sir, you are one talented Soul. You capture scenes we have all seen, except, in your case, you dooooo guild the lily, and sometimes gilding is a good thing. Thank you, Gary, for ongoing eye glory.

    • Thanks, Jim. It’s a common misconception that a photographer’s obligation is to capture the world as we see it. Good photographers understand that that’s impossible, and instead try to reveal aspects of the world that are overlooked by, or invisible to, the human eye.

  2. Ah Gary, someday you need to downsize to a oar raft/dory trip. The sixteen days the trip I did gives you some more “reading” time. The Grand is one of the best river trips I’ve done.

  3. Gary, I think you are one of the best nature photographers working, I love your images.

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